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Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Franklin Hall 0030B
601 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, Indiana 47405, United States
Visit Center for Documentary Research and Practice
812-855-2856
The Oral History Archive began in 1968 gathering interviews for the IU sesquicentennial. The archive expanded with other projects, mostly focused on the history of Indiana and the Midwest such as labor, politics, medicine, immigration, and social history. The archive contains over 2,000 interviews--audio files, transcripts, and some video. The archive is now housed in the Center for Documentary Research and Practice, a unit of the Media School.

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Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project includes people living in and around Paoli, Indiana. The project includes people's experiences and attitudes toward death, dying, and illness. The interviewees share their feelings on losing loved ones. They discuss the roles of religion, family, fear, and medical interventions in the process of death and dying. They also discuss the various preparations involved including, funerals and wills, as well as personal preparations.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In the Tuba-Euphonium Oral History Project, seven tuba musicians were interviewed about their early training and subsequent careers in the music industry. Each man--Robert Rusk, Jerry Lackey, L.B. Oliver, Ivan F. Hammond, Kenneth Schubert, Samuel Gnagey, and Paul Krzywicki discussed instrument design and different methods of teaching about and playing the tuba. All five of these men studied at Indiana University and went on to play in other venues. They talk about their experiences with William J. "Bill" Bell at Indiana University as well as Bell's methods of teaching at the school.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project deals with Latino immigrants, most of whom are from Mexico and have settled in and around Indianapolis, Indiana. The interviewees discuss immigrating, transitioning into life in the United States, the important role religion--Catholicism in particular--plays in their lives, and the active role they take in their communities. Most of the transcribed interviews are in Spanish.
 

4. Women's History, 1977-1980 6 Interviews

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Interviews include discussion of the Equal Rights Amendment, the women's movement, politics, civic affairs, and the Nineteenth Amendment. Most interviewees were born during the 1930s and discussed their involvement in Bloomington, Indiana from the 1940s-1970s.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, four former professionals in the roller skating business recount their experiences as well as their hopes for the future of roller skating. All four men discuss the relationship beteen skating and music. In particular, these men seem to be nostalgic for organ music and the disco era. They also discuss different inventions that revolutionized the skating business, such as floor waxes and in line skates.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The interviews in this collection primarily discuss civil rights issues in Claiborne County, Mississippi. Some topics discussed are Black voter registration, school integration, and freedom of choice. The interviewees' childhoods, including the Great Depression and World War II, are also talked about in the interviews. The interviews were conducted as research for the Ph.D. dissertation Common Courtesy: The Civil Rights Movement in Claiborne County, Mississippi by the interviewer.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, James P. White, the American Bar Association consultant on legal education, discusses the history, changes, goals, conflicts, and mission of that institution. He describes his involvement in legal education activities and the occasionally rocky relations between the association and the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar. Law schools, legal specialization, and the commercialization of the legal profession are also major topics within this interview.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews gathers information about economic development from some key locations in southwestern Indiana, Indianapolis, and northwestern Indiana, among others. Topics include environmental issues, Brownfield redevelopment, tax incentives, and labor unions. Many issues are the same from one region to another, but some regions, such as northwestern Indiana, emphasize environmental or Brownfield redevelopment over unions or workforce training.
 

10. Careers in Librarianship, 1992 10 Interviews

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The Career in Librarianship project includes interviews with ten people employed in libraries or library education. Three of the interviewees were Deans of Indiana University's School of Library and Information Science, or SLIS. Others include a SLIS lecturer, a high school librarian, a college archivist, 2 public library directors, and a public library branch head. All of the interviewees worked in Indiana (except for one of the public library directors, who worked in Michigan). Collectively, the interviews consider the training that librarians receive, librarianship as a career, as well as changes in, and the future of, the profession. The interviews were conducted by students of the Indiana University School of Library and Information Science as a project for a class on the history of American libraries.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project consists of Southern Indiana inhabitants discussing their life histories and their affiliation with area churches. Many of the interviewees discuss growing up on a farm and community cooperation during butchering and threshing seasons. Throughout these interviews they discuss church history, church picnics, and the church community. They also talk about the merger of the Congregational, Reformed and Evangelical churches into the United Church of Christ. The interviewees discuss the changes this had on the church ceremonies and activities. Two of the interviewees attend the Catholic Churches in the area and they discuss traditions and changes that they have seen in the Catholic Church since Vatican II and throughout their lifetimes.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project, Dubois County: German Americans, deals with an area in Indiana rich with German Heritage. The interviewees discuss the history of the area, their lives and lifestyles, and the importance of religion, usually German Catholicism. They also discuss German dialects still spoken in and around the county, as well as how the language has influenced their English speaking.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project, Dubois County: A Home for God's People, consists of interviews of residents, most of whom could trace their ancestry back to the original German settlement of the area. The interviewees shared their German heritage and discussed the almost clan-like German Catholic communities, and how they grew and changed over the years since there first establishment. The Catholic church was discussed as a central point of the communities, as was the German language and its various dialects and farming as a way of life.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews deals with the role of religion and ethnicity, specifically German-American, in Dubois County, Indiana. Subjects range from church celebrations and events to the use of nuns as teachers in the public schools. The use of the German language in the community is also widely covered, such as where it was used, who spoke it, and when it began to change primarily to English.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews delves into several areas of Dubois County history between the two world wars. The most spoken of topics are religion, church events, and the use of German in various locales within the community. Also discussed are Prohibition and the notoriety of the county's moonshine industry, the Great Depression, and education in one-room schoolhouses.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In the interview, Charles S. Hyneman discusses the evolution of the political science discipline in the twentieth century, curriculum development, and Indiana state politics. Also discussed are Hyneman's careers in the academic field and the United States War Department, and his tenure as president of the American Political Science Association.
 

18. Indiana Medicine, 1993 59 Interviews

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project is comprised of 59 interviews with doctors who have practiced medicine in the state of Indiana from approximately the nineteen thirties until the nineteen seventies, eighties, and nineties. The doctors share personal anecdotes about their medical practices in both rural and urban areas, their perspectives on the many changes medicine has undergone in the twentieth century, and the greatest satisfaction they received from their profession. Many interviews include physicians' experiences during World War II, African-American physicians' experiences under segregation, and how each individual adjusted to a profession that became increasingly specialized over the years.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews presents the life histories and impressions of a variety of residents from or near Paoli, Indiana. The interviewees range in age from early twenties to senior citizens and represent diverse professions, educational levels, and interests. This collection highlights some of the major changes in Orange County over the twentieth century and provides insight into the rich community life experienced by its residents.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project discusses labor in Indiana. The main topics include the labor movement in Indiana, women and work, coal mining, and auto workers. The United Auto Workers, United Mine Workers of America, and other labor unions are discussed. The interviewees discuss participation in labor strikes and the leadership in their unions.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews reflects on the Indianapolis, Indiana neighborhood, Stringtown. While a wide variety of ages is represented, most of the interviewees are older individuals. Pervasive throughout is the idea that Stringtown is a relatively stable, distinct neighborhood with well-defined boundaries. Some of the major topics include the increase of crime and vandalism, the increased delinquency of the children due, in part, to parental neglect, the decline of the community in terms of housing and business, and the lack of education and ambition among many of the residents. Also discussed is the closing of School 16, the familial ties within the community, and the role of church and politics in the neighborhood.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The interviews in this collection concern life in Starke County, Indiana, primarily in the early part of the twentieth century. Dairy and pickle farming, along with their associated industries, are the major topics of discussion, but also described are schools, politics, ethnic communities, other types of farming, and community changes.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews deals with different ethnic groups in Indiana between the 1910s and the 1970s. Most of the interviewees are first generation Americans born around the turn of the century. They share their life histories, discussing mainly the World War II era, what they lived through, what brought them to the United States, and how they adjusted to American life. They discuss their native cultures and traditions, as well as their involvement in American life.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The interviews in this project discuss Indiana politics from the nineteen thirties to the nineteen seventies. Presidential elections and Republican conventions are topics of major importance. Also included, however, are discussions about House committees and legislative bills as well as a description of important agricultural events during the time period.
 

26. IU Folklore Institute, 1987 41 Interviews

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project deals with the beginning, the building, and the growth of the Indiana University (IU) Folklore Institute into an internationally recognized program. The interviewees are mostly students and/or faculty of the folklore program from the 1940s to the 1980s. They discuss those who most influenced and impacted the institute, namely Stith Thompson and Richard M. Dorson. They share their memories and experiences of the time they spent, or continue to spend, in the IU Folklore Institute.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The Indian American Community in Fort Wayne interviews focus on those Indian persons who have either permanently or temporarily made Fort Wayne, Indiana their home. These people have moved to Fort Wayne mostly for job-related purposes but have stayed on for other reasons: the excellent education system, the nice environment, and friendly community. The interviewees, some of whom were born here or have spent most of their lives here, share a common respect for Indian religious and social customs, diet, and language. These interviews thus provide keen insight into the ways Indian Americans shape their lives in the American context and how they combine Indian and American culture. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Indian American Communities in Indiana provides a sampling of Indian American voices, most of whom were born in India and now reside in the United States. Among the topics discussed are maintaining Indian cultural values in an American context, religious beliefs and practices, imparting Indian traditions and values to children born to Indian parents but are growing up in the United States, differences between Indian born and American born Indian Americans, educational and career choices, politics of India and America, current events, Indian community associations, and cultural differences between India and America. his project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project, sponsored by a CLIO grant from the Indiana Historical Society, consists of interviews with Indian Americans living in Indiana. The interviewees, the majority of whom were born in India and immigrated to the United States, discuss a variety of topics including: Indian foodways, Indian traditions, Indian national politics, education, career choice, family history, parenting philosophy, reasons for coming to the United States, reasons for remaining in the United States, citizenship and naturalization, marriage and dating customs. media coverage of India, and differences between Indian and American cultures. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project consists of Indian American views of all aspects of life in the United States and India. Most interviewed in this project were born in India and came to America in search of better education, or because their spouse came for more educational and business oppurtunities. They discuss their reasons for immigrating to the United States, and their reasons for remaining to raise their children. They talk about the ways they practice Indian traditions and values in an American context and the importance of the larger Indian American community in their lives. They also discuss advantages and disadvantages of living in America, and what they miss or don't miss about their homeland of India. Other topics discussed are educational background, work history, religion and religious practice, and raising children. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The interviews in this project are centered around the experiences of Koreans who immigrated to the United States and settled in Indiana. Many of the interviewees comment on conditions in Korea, the reasons they decided to leave that country, and the opportunities they found in the United States. In addition, several interviewees speak of the cultural differences they have discovered, and of the development of Korean American communities.
 

32. IU School of Music, 1983 1 Interview

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Wilfred C. Bain, dean of the School of Music from 1947 to 1973, discusses his career as an administrator in various colleges. He focuses on his time at the Indiana University School of Music, discussing the policies he feels made the school the success it is today. He also discusses his theories and philosophies behind music education and how he has tried to implement them at the School of Music.
 

33. Indianapolis Blues, 1985 5 Interviews

Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
These interviews trace the life histories of five blues musicians in Indianapolis, Indiana. The interviewees discuss their experiences, their knowledge of blues and jazz, and their musical contemporaries. In addition, several comment on the segregation and racism that characterized life in the earlier part of the twentieth century.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project centers around interviews with professional and/or personal acquaintances of Elinor and Vincent Ostrom. Every interview explores a unique relationship with the Ostroms and the continuing impact of the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University. Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom founded the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis in 1973.The Ostrom Workshop has been the catalyst for worldwide collaboration in the field of public policy and environmental issues. "Coming Together" is an interdisciplinary exploration of the legacy and impact of Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom. Major topics include; academia, "the commons", cross-disciplinary collaboration, Elinor Ostrom's Nobel Prize, the Ostrom Workshop, political science, political theory, and the Workshop on the Ostrom Workshop (WOW) conference. The project was created to assist in the dissertation research of Sara Catherine Clark, who was a doctoral candidate within the School of Education, pursing a Ph.D. in History, Philosophy, and Policy in Education, at Indiana University Bloomington. Sara Catherine Clark's dissertation was completed in 2019 and is cited as follows: Clark, S. C. (2019). Elinor ostrom: A biography of interdisciplinary life.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project consists of interviews with Russian and Tatarian mothers of three different generations, those born before 1912, those born between 1912 and 1930, and those born after 1930. The interviewees talk about the change in norms and acceptance regarding motherhood due to wars and government changes. Topics discussed include motherhood, reproduction, infant and child mortality, courtship and marriage, fertility and abortion, prenatal care, maternity homes, maternity leave, and pediatric services. These interviews show how traditional practices blended with modern medical practices and ideas over the last one hundred years These interviews were used by David Ransel in his book Village Mothers "2000." The interviews have been transcribed in Russian with some English notes.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project examines the lives of Ukrainian American immigrants. Two of the interviews are conducted in Ukrainian. The time periods covered are the 1930s-1990s. The interviewees discuss immigration, traditions, religion and Ukrainian American community organizations. Some of major topics are the United States culture, Ukrainian American youth organizations, Ukrainian religious ceremonies in the United States, and Ukrainian language and culture instruction. Ukrainian wedding and holiday traditions are also discussed.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews primarily covers U.S. foreign relations with Great Britain during World War II. While other countries, specifically the Soviet Union, are mentioned, most of the interviewees were in some way connected to Britain. Major topics include the openness in sharing information between the U.S. and Britain, Lend-Lease, and a discussion of various diplomats. Most interviewees complete their post-war history with a description of their duties in the locations they were later reassigned.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews primarily delves into the Republican view of Indiana politics from the nineteen twenties to the early nineteen sixties. Major emphasis is placed on both state and national elections and conventions from 1940-1948. The project contains discussions of political campaigns (including finances), the patronage system, and legislation battles. The interviews also reflect on William Jenner by describing his character, beliefs, and influence on Republican politics in Indiana.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews primarily delves into the Republican view of Indiana politics from the nineteen twenties to the early nineteen sixties. Major emphasis is placed on both state and national elections and conventions from 1940-1948. The project contains discussions of political campaigns (including finances), the patronage system, and legislation battles. The interviews also reflect on William Jenner by describing his character, beliefs, and influence on Republican politics in Indiana.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The collection of interviews in this project reflects James Jones' study of the Kinsey Institute's evolution and reception at Indiana University. He interviews a variety of individuals associated with the Institute by having worked there or having been a member of a foundation that funded Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey's efforts. The interviewees discuss Dr. Kinsey's dedication to his work, his move from studying gall wasps to human sexual behavior, his effectiveness as an interviewer and lecturer, and his personal commitment to the Institute. There is also mention of Dr. Kinsey's influence on science and the Institute's problems with funding. James Jones eventually published a biography of Dr. Kinsey in 1997. It is entitled Alfred C. Kinsey: A Public/Private Life and it is published by W.W. Norton and Company.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This oral history of the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University traces creation of the Center from its earliest stages and its evolution into a fully operating academic institution dedicated to the study of philanthropy. It includes the negotiations in bringing the Fund Raising School to Indianapolis, Indiana, the grant proposals to the Lilly Endowment, finding the Center's first director, and the creation of its mission statement. This project also contains many different people's views on the study of philanthropy and the importance and success of the Center.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project follows the Indiana Humanities Council from its beginnings in the 1960s until the present. The interviewees discuss their roles in the council, whether as a staff member or a board member. They discuss the founding of the council, the growth and changes it's undergone, the projects that it has funded, and those that it currently funds, according to their particular tenure. The interviewees also talk about the council's importance, positive work ethic, and good staff relations.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The interviews in this collection primarily address New Harmony in the early twentieth century. The interviewees discuss the Centennial celebration, 1913 Flood, Murphy lecture series, and the impact of religion in the community. Throughout the collection, knowledge is shared of the early Rappite and Owen communities, particularly in regards to changes in the community as they relate to the historic preservation movement.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project deals with the changes and conditions Calumet, Michigan has undergone since its origins as a copper mining company town. The interviewees discuss the ethnic diversity of the town, effects of the 1913 mining strike, effects of the Great Depression, and local community life.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project presents the perceptions of modern theater by five different people involved in the performance arts. Some of the topics touched upon include the differences between the three media of stage, television, and film, beginning experiences in the field of theater, and career paths and goals of the individual. The theory and philosophy of acting, directing and producing is also discussed.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project consists of interviews with four members of the Benedictine order who lived and worked at Saint Meinrad Archabbey. Some major topics of discussion include religious training and education, daily monastic life, the business ventures of the abbey, and the history of the abbey. In addition, the interviewees discuss the vows and roles of priests and monks, as well as the abbey's relationship with the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews focuses on ongoing social problems in the United States and the world, such as overpopulation, famine, and depletion of the Earth's resources. The interviewees are almost all former Indiana University professors in their seventies. All of the interviewees are asked to recall their teenage years and share their opinions about current teenagers. They also discuss their media habits in detail. For example, each interviewee is asked how many hours of television he or she watches daily and which programs are preferred. They are also asked about their reading habits and whether or not they listen to the radio. Interviewees are asked to judge the reliability of news programs on a variety of media. Finally, interviewees are asked to provide predictions for the future of society.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project contains information about the movie theater industry in Bloomington, Indiana in the 1930s to present. Interviewees discuss their remembraences of movie theaters: the movies they saw, the people they worked with, the fires that periodically destroyed the theaters, and their interior decoration. Interviewees also talk about the theater business today and how it has changed over the years.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
These four interviews of Indiana physicians focus on the interviewees' experiences in the field of medicine over the twentieth century. They speak of the many changes in medicine over the years, their medical education, and they relate personal anecdotes from their experience practicing medicine.