Collections : [Center for Documentary Research and Practice]

Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Franklin Hall 0030B
601 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, Indiana 47405, United States
Visit Center for Documentary Research and Practice
812-855-2856
The Oral History Archive began in 1968 gathering interviews for the IU sesquicentennial. The archive expanded with other projects, mostly focused on the history of Indiana and the Midwest such as labor, politics, medicine, immigration, and social history. The archive contains over 2,000 interviews--audio files, transcripts, and some video. The archive is now housed in the Center for Documentary Research and Practice, a unit of the Media School.

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Center for the Study of History and Memory
Congressman Lee Hamilton (1931- ) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Indiana from 1965-1999, and worked as a Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee. His scope of work allows him to draw poignant connections between the social and political upheaval of the 1960's Vietnam War and Civil and Women's Rights Movements with the challenges of the first decades of the 21st Century. He describes the shift of the American experience from post-WWII exceptionalism to the cynicism of the Watergate Scandal and 9/11. His anecdotes about Presidents from Johnson to Obama (including Christmas Day games with Bush) offer quirky, insider perspectives about each of their idiosyncrasies. He is now a member of the U.S. Homeland Security Advisory Council and is the Director of the Center on Congress and a professor at Indiana University, encouraging youth to improve on the flaws and structural issues of Congress he saw while working there.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project centers around interviews with professional and/or personal acquaintances of Elinor and Vincent Ostrom. Every interview explores a unique relationship with the Ostroms and the continuing impact of the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University. Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom founded the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis in 1973.The Ostrom Workshop has been the catalyst for worldwide collaboration in the field of public policy and environmental issues. "Coming Together" is an interdisciplinary exploration of the legacy and impact of Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom. Major topics include; academia, "the commons", cross-disciplinary collaboration, Elinor Ostrom's Nobel Prize, the Ostrom Workshop, political science, political theory, and the Workshop on the Ostrom Workshop (WOW) conference. The project was created to assist in the dissertation research of Sara Catherine Clark, who was a doctoral candidate within the School of Education, pursing a Ph.D. in History, Philosophy, and Policy in Education, at Indiana University Bloomington. Sara Catherine Clark's dissertation was completed in 2019 and is cited as follows: Clark, S. C. (2019). Elinor ostrom: A biography of interdisciplinary life.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Renowned folklorist Henry Glassie was interviewed by Barbara Truesdell on March 13, April 4, April 24, April 30, May 7, May 10, May 29, and June 6, 2007 concerning his influences, career, projects, publications, and views on folklore and history. Conducted for the National Council of Public History for their journal, Public Historian.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews examines the experiences of Japanese Americans in the Indianapolis area. The interviewees, many of whom were born in Japan prior to World War II, focus on what compelled them to move to Indiana and their impressions of a Japanese American community. In particular, the interviewees detail the work of political and social organizations like the Japan America Society and Japanese American Citizens League. These groups' activities combined the fostering of traditional Japanese cultural forms like art, language, and dancing in the United States with political work like the Redress Movement to confront the experience of internment for many Japanese Americans during World War II.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews presents a sampling of life in Burma over the last quarter of the 20th century and into the 21st century. The interviewees, who are all now living in the United States, share their experiences of growing up in a time of transition and political upheaval within their home country. Many of them were involved with the 1988 demonstrations that took place in Rangoon and nearby villages. Almost all spent some time living in fear of arrest, surviving in refugee camps, and hoping for better opportunity. They express varying opinions of their hope for a future democratic Burma and express their appreciation for the lives they have now. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The project deals with Latino immigrants, most of whom are from Mexico and have settled in and around Indianapolis, Indiana. The interviewees discuss immigrating, transitioning into life in the United States, the important role religion--Catholicism in particular--plays in their lives, and the active role they take in their communities. Most of the transcribed interviews are in Spanish.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, four former professionals in the roller skating business recount their experiences as well as their hopes for the future of roller skating. All four men discuss the relationship beteen skating and music. In particular, these men seem to be nostalgic for organ music and the disco era. They also discuss different inventions that revolutionized the skating business, such as floor waxes and in line skates.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, James P. White, the American Bar Association consultant on legal education, discusses the history, changes, goals, conflicts, and mission of that institution. He describes his involvement in legal education activities and the occasionally rocky relations between the association and the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar. Law schools, legal specialization, and the commercialization of the legal profession are also major topics within this interview.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In the Tuba-Euphonium Oral History Project, seven tuba musicians were interviewed about their early training and subsequent careers in the music industry. Each man--Robert Rusk, Jerry Lackey, L.B. Oliver, Ivan F. Hammond, Kenneth Schubert, Samuel Gnagey, and Paul Krzywicki discussed instrument design and different methods of teaching about and playing the tuba. All five of these men studied at Indiana University and went on to play in other venues. They talk about their experiences with William J. "Bill" Bell at Indiana University as well as Bell's methods of teaching at the school.