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Eddie Gilreath was one of the first African American music industry professionals to hold executive level marketing and sales positions with major record labels including Motown, Warner Bros., Elektra Entertainment, Geffen, and MCA/Universal Distribution, promoting major artists across multiple genres. Included are personal papers and correspondence, marketing reports, press clippings, photographs, certified gold and platinum album plaques, clothing, and time-based media in both published and unpublished audio and video formats.
 
This project is a compilation of interviews of subjects with strong ties to and memories of Indiana University, primarily at the Bloomington campus. The interviewees include former students, faculty, and staff, among others. The information contained in the interviews generally spans a little more than the first half of the twentieth century and often deals with the administrations under presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells. The project is a survey of Indiana University's history as a whole including information about various academic departments, athletics, student organizations, campus growth, university development, living conditions, segregation and the treatment of African-Americans, the administration, and the importance of jazz at Indiana University. In addition, the impact of specific events, such as the Great Depression, World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War, and water shortages, is detailed in many of the interviews in this project.
 

4. The Vagabond, 1923-1931 1 cubic foot (3 boxes)

Published from 1923 until 1931, primarily as a bi-monthly publication with some interruption, The vagabond featured the poetry, visual art, essays, criticism, short stories and humor which targeted not only Indiana University's undergraduates, but also its alumni and prominent members of the faculty.
 

6. Cleland mss., 1911-1946 0.6 linear feet (2 boxes)

The Cleland mss., 1911-1946, consists of the papers of botanist Ralph Erskine Cleland, 1892-1971. They consist chiefly of correspondence with prominent scientists on Oenothera, evening primrose.
 

7. Clemens mss. II, 1945 .1 linear feet (1 folder)

The Clemens mss. II, 1945, consists of letters sent to author Cyril Clemens, 1902-1999, of Kirkwood, Missouri, concerning a symposium planned in honor of Ernie Pyle (Ernest Taylor Pyle, 1900-1945, journalist) following his death on April 18.
 
Dorith Minna Ofri-Scheps (1930-2015), known as "Jɛbɛ" to the Vai people, was a linguist and scholar of the Vai language and culture. Her dissertation, "On the Object of ethnology: a propos of the Vai culture of Liberia 1963-88" was submitted and defended in 1991, at the University of Bern, after the outbreak of the First Liberian Civil War had interrupted her field research.Her correspondence covers many aspects of Vai language and culture, touching on the cumulative work of August Klingenheben, Bai Tamia Moore, Gail Stewart, Jangaba Johnson, C. K. Kandakai, and many others. Her research drew on interviews with Mɔmɔlu Cole, and her assistants included Morris Davies, who died in the war, Fatu Kiazolu, and in later life Poppy Willard.
 

10. Colfax mss., 1853-1884 .2 linear feet (2 folders (38 items).)

The Colfax mss., 1853-1884, consists of the papers of South Bend, Indiana, newspaperman, speaker of the House of Representatives, and vice-president of the United States Schuyler Colfax, 1823-1885.