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1. 32nd General Hospital Collection, ca. 1918-1997 1.1 cubic feet (1 document box, 1 pamphlet box, 2 flat boxes)

United States. Army. General Hospital (32nd)
World War I and World War II necessitated the expansion not only of the combat forces of the U.S. military but also of its medical services. To help meet this need, medical schools and the American Red Cross sponsored the creation of hospital units. The Indianapolis medical community followed this trend during both wars. In 1917, the Indianapolis Chapter of the American Red Cross established the unit eventually designated Base Hospital 32. Almost all of the doctors, nurses, and enlisted men originally assigned to the unit came from Indianapolis or central Indiana. In 1942, the Indiana University Medical Center set up the 32nd General Hospital. Named in honor of its World War I predecessor, this unit drew most of its original medical and nursing staffs from the IU Medical Center. Both units served in Europe. The records consist of photocopies of unit files of the 32nd General Hospital; unit histories, scrapbooks, and personal reminiscences compiled after the wars; records relating to reunions held by members of the 32nd General Hospital, photographs, an 8mm film of the 32nd General Hospital and two videotape copies of the film.
 

3. Adam Yarmolinsky Papers, 1973-1977 0.8 cubic feet (2 Document boxes)

Yarmolinsky, Adam
In 1973, the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs was formed to study the relationships between foundations, the government, and the public. To meet the needs of this study the Commission contracted with several individuals to do research and write papers. Adam Yarmolinsky served as both a researcher/author and a special consultant to the Commission. This collection includes the correspondence and papers of Adam Yarmolinsky related to his service to the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs.
 

5. Altrusa International, Inc. of Indianapolis Records, 1917-1997 3.7 cubic feet (3 cartons, 1 document box, and 1 pamphlet box)

Altrusa International
Altrusa International, Inc. is an international service organization for professional and executive business women with membership on a limited classification basis. The National Association of Altrusa Clubs, founded in 1917 as Altrusa Institute, was the first national organization of business and professional women. In 1935 Altrusa became international and the name was changed to International Association of Altrusa Clubs, Inc. The organization's name was changed again in June 1947, to Altrusa International, Inc. The Indianapolis Altrusa Club was formed in April 1917. Its programs and activities have included vocational education and guidance, senior citizens programs, civic service and community service projects, financial assistance for graduate women from other countries and literacy related programs. The organization's objectives are to cultivate friendly relationships and solidarity among business and professional women to encourage mutual helpfulness; to provide vocational information and service to women of all ages; to encourage members to actively participate in community, national and international affairs, and to promote educational and cultural training. The records consist of legal documents, board and committee records, meeting files, financial records, correspondence, publications, special event materials, scrapbooks, news clippings and photographs.
 

8. American City Bureau Records, 1919-1995 43.0 cubic feet (42 record cartons and 2 boxes)

American City Bureau
American City Bureau, a fundraising consulting firm, works with not for profit organizations to design and run fund raising campaigns. Established in 1913 by Edgar and Harold Buttenheim, the company merged with Beaver and Associates in 1963. The firm has worked on capital campaigns on the national and local level. American City Bureau has been instrumental in developing campaigns for organizations such as the Young Men's Christian Association,(YMCA), the Young Women's Christian Association, (YWCA), United Fund, and the Salvation Army. The records detail the fund raising efforts and campaigns of the American City Bureau and its predecessor origins. It consists of 4 page reports of campaigns from Howard T. Beaver Associates, (later Beaver and Associates) from 1936-1963, campaign information from American City Bureau from 1944 -1995, conference addresses and programs, from 1938-1978, promotional materials and publications from 1919- 1973, and their newsletter, Bureau News from 1920-1976.
 

10. American Turners Local Societies Collection, 1866-2016 10.2 cubic feet (8 cartons and 4 flat boxes)

American Turners Northwest Chicago (Chicago, Ill.)
Many Germans immigrated to the United States following the failure of an 1848 revolution designed to introduce democratic reforms into the governments of the German states. Among these immigrants were members of the Turners, an athletic and political organization founded in Germany during the second decade of the nineteenth century. Turners quickly established societies (known as Turnverein or Turngemeinde) in the American cities in which they settled. These societies served as athletic, political, and social centers for German communities in the United States. The Turners' most important contribution to American life in their communities has been their advocacy of physical education and fitness. Turners successfully lobbied local school boards in many cities for the inclusion of physical education classes in the curriculum, and Turner instructors served as the directors of physical education programs in many school systems in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.