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Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, James P. White, the American Bar Association consultant on legal education, discusses the history, changes, goals, conflicts, and mission of that institution. He describes his involvement in legal education activities and the occasionally rocky relations between the association and the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar. Law schools, legal specialization, and the commercialization of the legal profession are also major topics within this interview.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project contains an interview with Marion Woltman, the late Mr. Donnelly's wife. Ms. Woltman, born in 1877, discusses her marriage to the former congressman, author, and vice presidential candidate for the People's Party. She talks about her early childhood, in particular, her emigration to the United States from Norway. Ms. Woltman also speaks about her job as secretary for Mr. Donnelly at the Representative before they were married. Ms. Woltman reflects on her late husband's reading and eating habits and discusses the circumstances surrounding his death in 1901.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews presents a sampling of life in Burma over the last quarter of the 20th century and into the 21st century. The interviewees, who are all now living in the United States, share their experiences of growing up in a time of transition and political upheaval within their home country. Many of them were involved with the 1988 demonstrations that took place in Rangoon and nearby villages. Almost all spent some time living in fear of arrest, surviving in refugee camps, and hoping for better opportunity. They express varying opinions of their hope for a future democratic Burma and express their appreciation for the lives they have now. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The Career in Librarianship project includes interviews with ten people employed in libraries or library education. Three of the interviewees were Deans of Indiana University's School of Library and Information Science, or SLIS. Others include a SLIS lecturer, a high school librarian, a college archivist, 2 public library directors, and a public library branch head. All of the interviewees worked in Indiana (except for one of the public library directors, who worked in Michigan). Collectively, the interviews consider the training that librarians receive, librarianship as a career, as well as changes in, and the future of, the profession. The interviews were conducted by students of the Indiana University School of Library and Information Science as a project for a class on the history of American libraries.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, educators from Indiana state Christian schools reveal their beliefs about how modern public schools fail to impart the moral education and values that they feel are a requisite part of education. Many interviewees comment on the morally inadequate, corrupt, and even threatening environment that public schools represent to Christian (and other) students. The Christian teachers also elaborate on the teaching methods and programs used to teach students in their schools, as well as the state regulations the Christian schools must adhere to in order to remain open.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
These interviews consist primarily of interviewees discussing their relationships with Claude Barnett, their work at the Associated Negro Press, and Barnett's ongoing efforts at improving race relations. In addition, many interviewees comment on the difficulties they encountered while working for the Press and its impact on the Civil Rights Movement.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project centers around interviews with professional and/or personal acquaintances of Elinor and Vincent Ostrom. Every interview explores a unique relationship with the Ostroms and the continuing impact of the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University. Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom founded the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis in 1973.The Ostrom Workshop has been the catalyst for worldwide collaboration in the field of public policy and environmental issues. "Coming Together" is an interdisciplinary exploration of the legacy and impact of Elinor (Lin) and Vincent Ostrom. Major topics include; academia, "the commons", cross-disciplinary collaboration, Elinor Ostrom's Nobel Prize, the Ostrom Workshop, political science, political theory, and the Workshop on the Ostrom Workshop (WOW) conference. The project was created to assist in the dissertation research of Sara Catherine Clark, who was a doctoral candidate within the School of Education, pursing a Ph.D. in History, Philosophy, and Policy in Education, at Indiana University Bloomington. Sara Catherine Clark's dissertation was completed in 2019 and is cited as follows: Clark, S. C. (2019). Elinor ostrom: A biography of interdisciplinary life.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
The four interviews in the project discuss the creation of the Committee for Environmental Information. The interviewees talk about how they became involved in the group and the politics that they had to deal with along the way. Also discussed are the political and military situations of the time.
Collection
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This project consists of an interview with Carl Bachmann who is a former member of Congress and mayor of Wheeling, West Virginia. Mr. Bachmann talks about his experiences with the Fish Committee, which conducted an investigation of communist activities in the United States during the nineteen twenties and nineteen thirties. As a member of this committee, he secretly attended communist meetings and participated in the hearings and final reports. He briefly addresses why the committee never introduced any bills and discusses the committee's role in informing Americans about the extent of communist activities in this country. Finally, he discusses William Borah's 1936 presidential campaign in detail.