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Odo, Franklin
The 100th Infantry Battalion (Separate) was a racially segregated U.S. Army unit comprised of Americans of Japanese ancestry (AJA) from Hawaii, except for Caucasian officers. The unit's outstanding training records and demonstrated loyalty lifted the "4-C Unsuitable for Service" classification for other AJA and led to the formation of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, who later joined the 100th overseas. These American soldiers, simultaneously fighting the Axis Powers overseas and racism at home, are survived by their descendants, The Sons & Daughters, who work to share their parents' stories. This collection is made possible by 100th Infantry Battalion Veterans, formerly known as Club 100, and consists of donations made by veterans' Bernard Akamine and Ray Nosaka's children, Drusilla Tanaka and Ann Kabasawa, respectively, as well as by IU Kokomo faculty and students who visited Club 100 on class trips in 2006, 2008, and 2014.
 
Agency for Instructional Technology
The Agency for Instructional Technology (formally 1973-2015) was a non-profit organization based in Bloomington, Indiana that produced and distributed educational television and multimedia programs to schools in the United States and Canada. This collection contains the organization's administrative records, publications, and production files.
 
Alden, Dauril.
The Alden mss., 1951-2001, consists of correspondence and research files generated by historian Dauril Alden, 1926-, in preparation of his biography of Dutch and Portuguese colonial historian Charles Ralph Boxer, 1904-2000.
 
Diamant, Alfred, 1917-2012.
Alfred Diamant was a professor of Political Science at Indiana University from 1967 to 1988 and served as the Chair of Political Science and West European Studies. He taught all levels of political science from introductory to doctoral courses with a special interest in comparative government. This collection consists of Diamant's academic papers including class material, student correspondence, and personal publications.
 
Alpha Phi Omega. Mu Chapter (Indiana University)
Alpha Phi Omega is a national service fraternity founded on leadership, friendship, and service. The Mu Chapter of Alpha Phi Omega was established at Indiana University on December 15, 1929. The collection consists of correspondence, minutes, pledge records, newsletters, awards, videotapes, photographs, and scrapbooks.
 
American Association of University Professors. Indiana University, Bloomington Chapter.
The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is a nationwide organization established in 1915, and is open to membership by faculty, librarians, and academic professionals at accredited public and private colleges and universities. Its mission is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define professional values and standards within higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. There is evidence that the Indiana University Bloomington Chapter of the American Association of University Professors was active on campus as early as 1916 and remains active to the present. The collection consists of group publications, minutes, notes, correspondence, and other related materials.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
In this project, James P. White, the American Bar Association consultant on legal education, discusses the history, changes, goals, conflicts, and mission of that institution. He describes his involvement in legal education activities and the occasionally rocky relations between the association and the Section of Legal Education and Admission to the Bar. Law schools, legal specialization, and the commercialization of the legal profession are also major topics within this interview.
 
American Forum for Global Education.
The American Forum for Global Education (1986-2008) was a nonprofit organization created through the merger of Global Perspectives in Education, Inc. (1976-1986), which was a former branch of the Center for War/Peace Studies of the New York Friends Group, and the National Council on Foreign Language and International Studies. The American Forum for Global Education provided professional development, curriculum materials, lesson plans, and resources to educators for teaching students about global/international history, culture and sociopolitical issues. This collection is predominantly comprised of publications of the American Forum for Global Education and its predecessor organizations.
 

24. American Turners Local Societies Collection, 1866-2016 10.2 cubic feet (8 cartons and 4 flat boxes)

American Turners Northwest Chicago (Chicago, Ill.)
Many Germans immigrated to the United States following the failure of an 1848 revolution designed to introduce democratic reforms into the governments of the German states. Among these immigrants were members of the Turners, an athletic and political organization founded in Germany during the second decade of the nineteenth century. Turners quickly established societies (known as Turnverein or Turngemeinde) in the American cities in which they settled. These societies served as athletic, political, and social centers for German communities in the United States. The Turners' most important contribution to American life in their communities has been their advocacy of physical education and fitness. Turners successfully lobbied local school boards in many cities for the inclusion of physical education classes in the curriculum, and Turner instructors served as the directors of physical education programs in many school systems in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
 

25. American Turners Records, 1853-2017 33.1 cubic feet (29 cartons, 8 flat boxes)

American Turners (Organization)
Immigrants to the United States in the nineteenth century founded organizations that served as social centers, maintained cultural identity, and promoted the ideals and the interests of the immigrants and their American-born descendants. The American Turners is an example of such an organization. Established by German immigrants in 1850, the American Turners advocated a liberal political philosophy and fought to protect both the political rights and the German heritage of the immigrants. The Turners encouraged the practice of exercise and physical fitness, and they convinced school boards in many cities to make physical education a part of the educational curriculum. The American Turner records include annual reports, minutes and correspondence relating to the national officers, correspondence with local societies, national convention minutes and materials, financial and membership records, national committee records, records and materials from national sporting events sponsored by the American Turners, records of the Turner Pioneers and the Women's Auxiliary, Turner publications, and materials from the German Turner movement and other organizations related to the American Turners.
 

26. America's Promise Alliance Records, 1992-2019 40 cubic feet (37 record cartons, 3 oversized boxes)

America's Promise. The Alliance for Youth
America's Promise - The Alliance for Youth was founded at the Presidents' Summit for America's Future in 1997. The Five Promises to children are at the core of America's Promise and are as follows: Caring Adults; Safe Places; a Healthy Start; Marketable Skills; and Opportunities to Serve.
 
Anderson, Frank J., 1919-
The Anderson mss., 1967-2004, consist of the correspondence, catalogs, and ephemera of Frank John Anderson related to private press publishing, miniature books, and book collecting.
 
Brown, A. Peter
A. Peter Brown served as a member of the musicology faculty at the Indiana University School of Music from 1974 until his death in 2003. Brown's name is most closely associated with that of the composer Josef Haydn, on whom Brown wrote and co-authored no less than four books, as well as the critical score for Haydn's Die Schöpfung. Representing the whole of his scholarly career, this collection includes materials from Brown's time as a doctoral student, and as a scholar and teacher, comprised of correspondence, teaching files, grants materials, and research and writing files. Brown's research files make up the bulk of the collection.
 

32. Arikha, Avigdor mss., 1933-2011 6 Linear Feet (2 boxes, 2 oversize)

Arikha, Avigdor, 1929-2010
The Arikha mss., 1933-2011, consists of correspondence from writer Samuel Beckett, 1906-1989, to Avigdor Arikha, 1929-2010, and Arikha's wife, poet Anne Atik, 1932-. Arikha's various collected periodicals, catalogues, theatre ephemera, criticisms of Beckett, and other related items.
 
Dranes, Arizona
The collection consists primarily of contracts and correspondence between Arizona Dranes and the Consolidated Music Publishing House (owner of the Chicago OKeh Records franchise) from 1926-1929. Contracts for Nov. 15, 1926, include one song not commercially released (and possibly not recorded), "He's Got Better Things for You." Also included are articles about Dranes and this collection by the donor, Malcolm Shaw, and gospel historian Dr. Daniel E. Walker.
 

34. Arthur R. Metz papers, 1853-2018 6.6 cubic feet (10 boxes)

Arthur R. Metz
Arthur R. Metz was a student at Indiana University from 1904-1909 and one of the first recipients of the IU Distinguished Alumni Service Award. He was a doctor who served in multiple capacities including for hospitals, railroads, the military, corporations, and universities and also was a member of many medical organizations. The collection consists of Metz's family records, school materials, personal and professional correspondence, personal photographs, military and travel materials and photographs, magazine and newspaper clippings, medical and organizational publications, and professional certificates. There are also papers and photographs documenting the Metz Foundation and Metz Suite.
 

35. Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) Records, 1970-2010 51.4 cubic feet (49 record cartons, 1 document box, 5 pamphlet boxes, 3 flat boxes, and 1 cassette box)

Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action
The Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) was founded in 1971 by David Horton Smith and Bill Ready as the Association for Voluntary Action Scholars (AVAS). Their vision was to create an independent and impartial forum for researchers in the fledgling field of voluntary action and citizen participation. Major activities have included an annual conference and the publication of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly (NVSQ), formerly the Journal of Voluntary Action Research (JVAR); Citizen Participation and Voluntary Action Abstracts (CPVAA); and a newsletter. The organization's name change in 1991 signified diversification of the original mission, which now includes expanded outreach to researchers on nonprofit organizations and from previously neglected academic disciplines. The records consist of board and committee materials, correspondence, financial and administrative records, journals and newsletters, journal manuscript submissions, conference programs and proceedings, and grant proposals.
 

36. Athenaeum Damenverein and Women's Auxiliary Records, 1876-2007 4.4 cubic feet (3 cartons, 1 document box, 2 flat boxes)

Indianapolis Turn-Schwestern Verein
This women's organization was founded by the Socialer Turnverein (Social Athletic Club) in 1876 as the Indianapolis Turn-Schwestern Verein. It was initially intended to support the activities of the Turnverein, and especially to promote and oversee the girls' athletic classes, and to help enlarge and preserve the Turner library. Within a few years the Turn Sisters became known as the Damenverein (Women's Club) des Socialer Turnverein and began to undertake broader responsibilities in the community. As with most German societies, membership declined during World War I and use of the German language was dropped. The organization revived with the merging of several societies during the 1930s and becomes known as the Women's Auxiliary. Membership increased again after World War II as their focus drifted away from a wartime role as a service organization and more towards social activities. The gradual decline of the Athenaeum Turners through the 1970s and 1980s also affected the Women's Auxiliary. In the 1990s the Damenverein name was restored to recognize the earlier German connections, and in recent years the very limited activities of the group have become more closely linked with their German-American cultural identity. The records consist of constitutions and by-laws, minutes, correspondence, financial records, committee reports, membership lists and directories, event advertisements and photographs.
 

37. Athenaeum Foundation Records, 1894-2011 8.6 cubic feet (8 cartons, 1 flat box)

Athenaeum Foundation (Indianapolis, Ind.)
The Athenaeum Foundation was organized in 1991 and incorporated as a not-for-profit foundation operating under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The foundation's purposes was to acquire title to the Athenaeum, located at 401 East Michigan Street in Indianapolis; to raise funds for and supervise and direct the rehabilitation of building to maintain its architectural and aesthetic integrity as a historic structure; to educate the public about the history and significance of the Athenaeum; to foster the use of the building by the foundation itself, the building's tenants, and other organizations; and to oversee the management of the building.
 

38. Athenaeum Turners Records, 1876-2005 14.7 cubic feet (10 cartons, 8 flat boxes)

Athenaeum Turners
The Athenaeum Turner organization was founded in 1851 as the Indianapolis Turngemeinde. This athletic and social organization was patterned on German clubs that had supported the 1848 revolutions that attempted to form Liberal republics in several European kingdoms. The men who established the Indianapolis Turngemeinde and the competing Indianapolis Socialistischer Turnverein (merged in 1852 to form the Indianapolis Socialistischer Turnegemiende) tried to create a community focus for the rapidly expanding immigrant population. The activist political backgrounds of many German immigrants led to a strong emphasis on the Turner idea of developing both a strong mind and strong body in order to better serve society. After the American Civil War, for which many Turners volunteered due to anti-slavery beliefs and a desire to demonstrate loyalty to their adopted nation, the reorganized and renamed Indianapolis Socialer Turnverein became the primary focus for German business and culture in the city. Certainly the German House (das Deutsches Haus), built between 1894 and 1898, was designed to serve as more than just a center for physical training since it contained a restaurant, theaters, and a number of meeting rooms. From the 1890s, the leaders of the Turner organization were also directors or important officers in dozens of prominent businesses and cultural organizations. This led to some overlap in the interaction between public, private, and political affairs in the German community of Indianapolis - and this is reflected in the collection. The outbreak of World War I and the anti-German sentiment which followed led to a renaming of the building (as the Athenaeum) and contributed to a decline in the importance of the Turnverein. The organization, now known as the Athenaeum Turners, experienced a revival during the 1950s and remained active into the 1960s, though its activities gradually became more social and less athletic. By the 1970s American acculturation and suburbanization resulted in a rapid decline in membership and financial stability and the near collapse of the Turner society. It currently exists solely as a German cultural organization. The records consist of constitutions and by-laws, board and committee minutes, correspondence, officer and committee reports, financial records, membership lists, event advertisements, brochures, newsletters and photographs.
 

40. Bai T. Moore Papers, 1919-2004 23 cubic feet; (22 records cartons; 1 oversized materials box.)

Moore, Bai T.
Bai T. Moore was a renowned poet and author whose work was greatly influenced by his experiences growing up in Liberia. In addition to Moore's career as a writer, he served as a government official for several years, first as Chief of the Liberian Bureau of Agriculture, and later, as Deputy Minister of Information, Cultural Affairs and Tourism. This collection consists of government papers, ethnographic materials, published works, manuscripts, and drafts of his writings.
 

44. Bales mss., 1922-2000 1.25 linear feet (1 box)

Bales, George Carson ("Bob"), 1920-2016
The Bales mss., 1922-2000, consists of the papers, writings, research files, and photographs of Pyle family historian George Carson Bales, 1920-2016.
 
Jelavich, Barbara, 1923-1995
Both graduates of the University of California, Berkeley, Barbara and Charles Jelavich were hired at Indiana University in 1962 as specialists in Eastern European History by then Chair of the History Department Robert Byrnes. The majority of the collection reflects the work of Barbara while a small portion of the work of Charles is included with publications.
 
Barnhart, Clarence L. (Clarence Lewis), 1990-1993
The Barnhart Dictionary mss., 1929-2005, consists of the correspondence, business records, project files, reference books, notes, and proofs of lexicographer Clarence L. Barnhart, 1900-1993, and the dictionaries he edited.
 

52. Beacons mss., 2006-2008 3.75 Linear Feet (3 boxes)

Levitin, Alexis
The Beacons mss., 2006-2008, consists of the administrative files, correspondence, and manuscript materials of Beacons: A Magazine of Literary Translation and its creator and editor Alexis Levitin, 1942-.
 

53. Beldon Fund Records, 1954-2015 102 cubic feet (101 cartons, 1 document case, 2 flat boxes)

Beldon Fund
The Beldon Fund was created in 1978 by environmental philanthropist John R. Hunting as a national foundation focused on advocating for environmental policy. From 1982 to 1998, the Beldon Fund provided grants to organizations like American Environment Inc., the Clean Water Fund, the Ohio Environmental Council, and the Idaho Conservation League. In 1998, John Hunting sold his stock in Steelcase Inc. and endowed Beldon with $100 million, prompting him to rethink the direction of the foundation. Hunting believed that increasing global warming and environmental destruction required immediate attention, and so he planned a ten-year spend-out of the Beldon Fund. Initially, Beldon made grants in five program areas, but in 2001, feedback indicated their scope was too broad for their spend-out timeframe. Beldon refocused into two program areas—the Key States program and the Human Health and the Environment program. The Beldon Fund made its last grants in June 2008 and closed its doors in 2009, after the completion of the spend-out. Over the last ten years of the fund, Beldon spent $120 million in grants and projects. The Beldon Fund Records consist of grant proposals, grant reports, notification of grants, board minutes, executive director records, financial and administrative records, and correspondence.
 

55. Bell mss., 1942-2006 19 boxes

Bell, Charles G. (Charles Greenleaf), 1916-2010
The Bell mss., 1942-2006, consists of the correspondence, writings, and printer's proofs of the works of author Charles Greenleaf Bell, 1916-2010.
 
Beta Phi Mu. Chi Chapter (Indiana University, Bloomington).
The Chi Chapter of Beta Phi Mu, the international honor society for library and information studies, was established at Indiana University in 1971. Collection consists of administrative files that were created by various officers of the Chi Chapter from the first years of the group's existence through 2010.
 
Irvine, Betty Jo.
This collection consists of the personal research, publications, correspondence, and teaching materials of Betty Jo (B.J.) Irvine, the Director of the Indiana University Fine Arts Library from 1969 to 2007. It also contains work related to her activities with professional organizations such as Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA).
 

62. Betty van der Smissen papers, 1954-2008 8 cubic feet (8 boxes)

Van der Smissen, Betty, 1927-2008
Betty van der Smissen was an alumna of the University of Kansas and Indiana University and an educator, writer, and consultant in the field of outdoor recreation and risk management. Contents of this collection date from 1954 through 2008 and consist mainly of teaching material such as course syllabi, correspondence, readings, and exams; research and drafts of publications; handbooks and self-assesment material for park and recreation agency accreditations; and material related to van der Smissen's participation in professional organizations and conferences.
 
Beyond the Pale Productions.
The not-for-profit group Beyond the Pale Productions was founded in 1998 to promote avant-garde and improvisational jazz in the Bloomington, Indiana area. This collection includes includes press releases, newspaper clippings and flyers announcing upcoming concerts as well as background information on individual artists.
 
Bloomington Faculty Council.
The origins of the Bloomington Faculty Council can be traced back to a University reorganization begun by university president Elvis J. Stahr. In 1969 the Bloomington Faculy began their own council for policy and academic decisions, as the University Faculty Council became a legislative body for all faculty in the Indiana University system. This collection consists of the agendas, minutes, circulars and supporting documents of the Bloomington Faculty Council, the governing body of the university faculty on the Indiana University -Bloomington campus. The collection is organized into six series: Agendas, Minutes, Circulars, Supporting documents, Committee Files, and Subject Files.
 

73. Boehm mss., 1992-2008 0.1 Linear Feet (1 folio)

Boehm, Philip
The Boehm mss., 1992-2008, consists of translation drafts, page proofs, and correspondence relating to literary translations from German and Polish by noted American translator Philip Boehm, 1958-.
 

74. Boerner mss., 1779-2015 7 linear feet (4 boxes; 5 bound)

Wolzogen, Caroline von, 1763-1847
The Boerner mss., 1779-1828, consist of manuscripts, journals, and correspondence by and relating to German writers Caroline von Wolzogen, Oskar Seidlin, and Friedrich von Schiller, along with related research material from German literary scholar and Goethe researcher Peter Boerner.
 

75. Bond mss., 1965-2010 0.2 linear feet (1 box)

Bond, Edward, 1934-
The Bond mss., 1965-2010, consist of the drafts and newspaper clippings of theater director, poet, screenwriter, and playwright Edward Bond, 1934-.
 
Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program (Indiana University, Bloomington)
The Robert. A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program was established on the Bloomington campus in 1972 with the aid of a Lilly Endowment. It is now one of the largest and oldest programs supporting the interdisciplinary study of the Jewish people and civilization. The collection consists of the program's administrative and subject files documenting the creation and growth of the program and includes correspondence, reports, newsletters, videos, and photographic material.
 

79. Bouchercon mss., 1979-2019 10 linear feet

Anthony Boucher Memorial Mystery Convention
The Bouchercon mss., 1979-2019, consist of program books, badges, tote bags, and other materials associated with The Anthony Boucher Memorial Mystery Convention (Bouchercon).
 

80. Boyars mss., 1960-2009 105 linear feet (70 boxes)

Marion Boyars Publishing Ltd.
The Boyars mss., 1960-2010, consist of the publication materials, correspondence, professional records, and financial files of Marion Boyars Publishing Ltd, as well as a small amount of personal material belonging to Marion Boyars.
 

81. Boys and Girls Clubs of Indianapolis Records, 1895-2002 7.5 cubic feet (7 cartons and 2 flat boxes)

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis
The Boys and Girls Clubs of Indianapolis is a social service organization focusing on youth in Indianapolis. The organization started in 1893 as the Newsboy's Home. Founders of the home were Thomas C. Day; Caleb S. Denny, three term mayor of Indianapolis; Carrie Lowe Denny, his wife; and M.V. McGilliard, a local philanthropist. Today the Boys and Girls Clubs of Indianapolis operate ten clubs: five in clubhouse facilities and five clubs based at Indianapolis Public Schools. These clubs are strategically located in the city to serve the most at-risk youth. Programs offered by the organization's professional staff and volunteers include counseling, career development, cultural enrichment, social recreation, citizenship and leadership development, and individual and team sports. The records consist of association and individual club materials and include board of director's minutes, events and activities, fundraising and publicity, annual reports, individual club files, record books, photographs, and videos.
 
Bradley, David, 1920-1997.
The Bradley mss. II, 1986-2008 contains materials pertaining to the life and career of actor Charlton Heston, who was "discovered" by early pioneer of independent filmmaking David Bradley.
 

85. Breton mss. II, 1946-2010 25 items (1 box; 6 folders; 3 books)

Breton, Jean
The Breton mss. II, 1946- , consist of literary works acquired through Jean Breton, proprietor of the firm of Librairie Saint-Germain-Des-Pres in Paris. Some of the writings are accompanied by letters and related materials.
 

88. Brock, G. mss., 2005-2007 2.5 linear feet (2 boxes)

Brock, Geoffrey, 1964-
The Brock, G. mss., 2005-2007, consist of the literary translation manuscripts, correspondence, and papers of poet and translator Geoffrey Brock, who teaches Creative Writing and Translation at the University of Arkansas.
 

89. Brookins v. South Bend Community School Corporation (SBCSC) collection (Civil Rights Heritage Center), 1954-2013, Bulk 1980-1983 6.4 cubic feet (4 standard records cases, 1 legal-size documents case, 1 letter-size documents case, and 1 oversize flat storage case.)

Albert, David W., 1939-
This collection contains documents related to South Bend, Indiana attorney David W. Albert's involvement as the legal representative for Brookins, et al. in the lawsuit of Brookins v. South Bend Community School Corporation (SBCSC) starting in 1980. The Brookins party alleged that the SBCSC and its representatives had engaged in various acts of discrimination with the intent and effect of segregating students and faculty on the basis of race in the South Bend, Indiana public school system. After the SBCSC decided on a desegregation plan, the Brookins party argued in court that the proposed plan would involve closing schools in the system that were racially integrated or could be easily integrated, therefore working against the goal of desegregation. The collection includes legal documents from the proceedings of the case itself; research files utilized by Albert to gather and present statistics and data about racial distribution within the South Bend community and schools in the SBCSC; and research into legal precedent established by prior cases related to school desegregation. The collection also includes minutes from SBCSC Board of Trustees meetings from 1977-1987 and documents related to the SBCSC Community Advisory Committee that was formed to provide community input on the formation of the desegregation plan, including Albert's participation in the Facilities Subcommittee in the early 1980s.
 
Bruner, Paul, 1941-
Bruner, Paul mss., ca. 1967-2011, consist of Paul Bruner's artist's book edition of the 1954 Holocaust era poem, "The Plains," written by Polish poet Tadeusz Rozewicz and translated by Paul Mayewski, as well as accompanying materials.
 
Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
This collection of interviews presents a sampling of life in Burma over the last quarter of the 20th century and into the 21st century. The interviewees, who are all now living in the United States, share their experiences of growing up in a time of transition and political upheaval within their home country. Many of them were involved with the 1988 demonstrations that took place in Rangoon and nearby villages. Almost all spent some time living in fear of arrest, surviving in refugee camps, and hoping for better opportunity. They express varying opinions of their hope for a future democratic Burma and express their appreciation for the lives they have now. This project was co-directed by Professor M. Gail Hickey of the School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne.
 

98. Calloway Collection, 1966-2014 10 document cases (5.11 linear feet)

Larson, Gloria
This collection documents the careers of the Calloway family including brothers Reggie, Vincent, and Gregory and their mother Gloria Calloway Larson, who variously formed and/or managed the groups Sunchild, Midnight Star, Calloway and Sharp. Included are personal papers, correspondence, business and financial records, tour itineraries, publicity materials, press clippings, programs, photographs, and time-based media in both published and unpublished audio and video formats.
 
Williams, Camilla, 1919-2012.
Camilla Williams was an internationally acclaimed soprano opera vocalist who broke racial bias barriers in society as well as professionally. Miss Williams came to Indiana University in 1977 as a professor of voice at the Jacobs School of Music. The collection contains performance posters, correspondence, clippings about her career and former student's accomplishments, photographs, awards, plaques, and scrapbooks.
 

100. Campbell, Mary mss., 1954-2012 75 linear feet

Campbell, Mary, 1934-2012
The Campbell, Mary mss., 1954-2012, consist of the personal correspondence, writings, photographs, concert and theatre programs, and professional materials of music and theatre journalist Mary Campbell.