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1. IU-Indianapolis Downtown Campus Records, 1915-1985 8.7 cubic feet (7 cartons, 1 document box, 3 flat boxes)

Indiana University started offering regular classes in Indianapolis in 1891. An Extension Division was created in 1912 and began to offer a small number of courses for credit. A gradual increase of class offerings and enrollments in Indianapolis occurred in the following decades. The university occupied a variety of buildings in downtown Indianapolis over the years in what over time became known as the Downtown Campus (DTC). Courses in liberal arts, social sciences, mathematics, and the natural sciences were offered by the Downtown Campus, whereas Indiana University's professional schools located in Indianapolis (i.e., the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, and Law, etc.) offered separate programs loosely connected to the other. The creation of IUPUI in 1969 more closely fused the various separate entities of Indiana University in Indianapolis together. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, publications, and other materials.
 
Transcripts for oral history interviews related to philanthropy, which were conducted by the Indiana University Center for Documentary Research and Practice, formerly known as Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory, formerly known as the Indiana Oral History Research Center. The American Foundations Oral History Project consists of a series of interviews with prominent American philanthropists, each of whom relates their background, the development of their values, and their philosophies of philanthropy. The purpose and state of American philanthropy, including those family foundations and corporate foundations, form a central topic, as do the recent trend of increasing diversity and opinions on grant evaluation and philanthropic assessment. In addition, many interviewees comment on the role of government in philanthropy and the system of ethics at play in American philanthropy. The Center on Philanthropy Oral History Project traces creation of the Center from its earliest stages and its evolution into a fully operating academic institution dedicated to the study of philanthropy. It includes the negotiations in bringing the Fund Raising School to Indianapolis, Indiana, the grant proposals to the Lilly Endowment, finding the Center's first director, and the creation of its mission statement. This project also contains many different people's views on the study of philanthropy and the importance and success of the Center. The "Philanthropy: a history of fund raising" Project discusses the history of philanthropy and fundraising as a profession. The interviewees, all workers of different generations, discuss the various issues and changes the field of fundraising has faced over the years, with a major focus on fundraising in America. The changing public image of philanthropy, the introduction of women into the field, and the skills and techniques needed within the profession are all discussed in depth throughout the interviews. The major differences between various types of fundraising are also discussed.
 
The Indiana University Audio-Visual Center (IU-AVC) was a service of the Indiana University Extension Division that produced, collected and distributed educational films and videos to institutions and organizations throughout the United States. The films, videos and all paper documentation that made up this century old film distribution unit of Indiana University was transferred to the IU Libraries in the early 2000's. As part of what is now the core holdings of the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive, in addition to the films and videos that made up the early years of the Archive, the paper teacher's guides that correspond to instructional films and videos spanning the late 1920's into the early 2000's are an important historical record of this history.
 

5. Office of the Dean of the Faculties/Executive Vice Chancellor Records, 1966-2007 309.1 cubic feet (308 cartons, 2 document boxes, and 1 flat box)

This collection contains the records of the Office of the Dean of the Faculties and of the Executive Vice Chancellor. The dean of the faculties is the chief academic officer at IUPUI and oversees the development and administration of academic programs, faculty appointments, professional development, promotion and tenure, and academic support operations. The executive vice chancellor is the second highest ranking administrator in the IUPUI administration. The title was created in 1973, and generally the person holding that position has also been the dean of the faculties. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, university publications, and files documenting the dean of the faculties/executive vice chancellor's role in the development of IUPUI's academic programs and the administrator's involvement with community, regional, and national organizations.
 

6. The Date, 1946-1947 .4 cubic feet (2 small dc)

The Date was an Indiana University student-published editorial circulated in late 1940s that documented campus culture in a light and humorous way. This small collection consists of issues spanning 1946-1947.
 
The I Association (formerly I-Men Association (1913-2006) and I-Women Association (1982-2006)) honors exceptional athletes at Indiana University Bloomington. This collection contains files about I Association alumni events and event planning, Board of Directors meeting information, I Association membership, and email, letter, and memo correspondence between I Association staff and alumni.
 

8. Willkie Residence Center scrapbooks and other materials, 1962-2007, bulk 1968-1981 1 cubic foot (4 scrapbooks, 3 legal folders and 1 oversize folder)

The Wendell L. Willkie Quadrangle opened in the fall of 1964 as a residence hall for men and women, and was rededicated as the Willkie Residence Center in 2000. This collection contains four scrapbooks that were compiled by staff of the Willkie Quadrangle residence hall between 1968 and 1981. The scrapbooks contain photographs, newspaper clippings, event pamphlets, and other materials that document staff and resident events during their respective time periods. In addition, the collection contains loose photographs of Willkie staff and leadership teams from 2004-2007, as well as loose newspaper clippings and other materials documenting Willkie residents and staff from the late 1960s to the early 1980s.
 

11. Edmund Battersby papers, 1968-2013 2.6 cubic feet (3 boxes, 5 oversize folders)

Edmund Battersby was an internationally renowned concert virtuoso pianist and professor at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. This collection contains materials from his professional career as a touring musician including: posters, programs, sheet music, and correspondence, the bulk of which stems from the 1970s to the 1990s.
 

12. The Black Student Voice, July 1968 .1 cubic foot (2 folders)

The Black Student Voice was a newsletter published by the "Office of Afro-American Affairs" at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. This group was established by Black student activists in the spring of 1968 as a means of advocating for the creation of a formal university office to oversee the academic, social, and financial wellbeing of Black students, faculty, and staff, as well as an academic program in Black Studies. The collection contains four issues of The Black Student Voice newsletter, which the Office published weekly throughout the month of July 1968.
 
This collection is comprised of books that were part of the Kokomo Extension Division Library collection prior to the establishment of the current Indiana University Kokomo campus on Washington Street in 1965. Indiana University established its first extension division in Kokomo, Indiana, in 1945. First located in a house on West Taylor Street, the division moved to West Sycamore Street in 1946 and expanded to include the Seiberling Mansion, Carriage House, and Elliott House.
 

20. Purdue University Records, 1943-1997 16 cubic feet (16 cartons)

Purdue University was founded as a state Land Grant university in 1869 at West Lafayette, Indiana. It has created several regional, or extension, campuses, including a campus in Indianapolis (see UA-060, Purdue University-Indianapolis Extension) that became IUPUI. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, bulletins, publications, and other records.
 

24. IU Board of Trustees Records, 1966-2012 11 cubic feet (9 cartons and 6 document boxes)

The Indiana University Board of Trustees is the governing body of Indiana University. By agreement in the merger of the Indianapolis campuses of Indiana University and Purdue University in 1969, the resulting IUPUI would be governed by the IU Board of Trustees. Records include minutes, agendas, and other records.
 

27. Cooper mss. III, 1927-1980 .35 linear feet (1 folder; 1 oversized folder; 35 items.)

The Cooper mss. III, circa 1927-1980, consists of letters, photographs, and memorabilia such as plaques and resolutions, of and relating to journalist and Associated Press Director Kent Cooper, 1880-1965.
 

28. Duval, K. D. mss., 1973-1976 630 items (2 boxes, 1 oversize)

​The Duval, K. D. mss., 1973-1976, consists chiefly of the correspondence between Kulgin Dalby Duval, bookseller, and 23 British bookbinders commissioned by him to produce original bindings for a catalogue and exhibition: British Bookbinding Today.
 

29. Eastman, A.F. mss., 1896-1956 0.6 linear feet (2 boxes)

​The Eastman, A.F. mss., 1896-1956, consists of the correspondence of Anstice Ford Eastman, 1878-1937, surgeon, with his mother, Annis Bertha (Ford) Eastman, 1852-1910, minister; his father, Samuel Elijah Eastman, 1846-1925, clergyman; his sister, Crystal Eastman, 1881-1928, lawyer; and his brother, Max Eastman, 1882-1969, author.
 

34. Bright mss., 1832-1873 0.2 linear feet (1 box)

The Bright mss., 1832-1873, are mainly letters from, to, and about Jesse David Bright, 1812-1875, U.S. senator. The collection is made up of reproductions (i.e. photostats, typescripts, xerox copies, and microfilms), of material in other libraries, collected by Wayne J. Van der Weele for his doctoral dissertation "Jesse David Bright, master politician from the Old Northwest," at Indiana University, 1958.
 

35. Brooks mss., 1838-1845 26 items (1 folder)

The Brooks mss., 1838-1845, consist of letters to Thomas Jefferson Brooks at Mt. Pleasant, Martin County, Indiana, from John Bell of Louisville, Kentucky, agent for trustees of Bell Evans Co., Daniel Hunt of Boston, Massachusetts, David Jones of Belleville, Illinois, Nancy Newell of Pittsford, Virginia, George Brown, Henry B. Shields, Thomas Lacy Smith, and Charles Woodruff of New Albany, Indiana; and to Lewis Brooks at New Albany, Indiana, from Rufus Brown of Mt. Pleasant, Indiana.
 

36. Brindeau mss., 1970-1976 0.6 linear feet (2 boxes)

The Brindeau mss., 1970-1976, consist of the incomplete text for La Poesie Contemporaine de langue Francais depuis 1945, edited chiefly by Serge Brindeau, 1925-1997, poet and editor, and letters largely to Brindeau about the work.
 

38. Office of University Architect Records, 1945-1983 23 cubic feet (23 cartons)

The Office of University Architect is a separate unit, based at Indiana University Bloomington, with an office on the IUPUI campus. The office plans and coordinates building and infrastructure projects, and works closely with Campus Facilities Services and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. Architectural drawings for IUPUI campus buildings and facilities are housed separately. Records include building and construction specifications, manuals, and other materials.
 

41. Coster mss., 1877-1938 .1 linear feet (1 folio.)

The Coster mss., 1877-1938, consists of letters to Lincoln collector Robert Coster, 1851?-1928, relating to Lincoln, and letters to his nephew Paul Coster, relating to Lincoln and to John Sherman.
 

42. Crist mss., 1861-1865 0.2 linear feet (1 box; 50 items.)

The Crist mss., 1861-1865, consists of letters to Barbara Ellen Crist, chiefly from her brother, Milton C. Crist, 1838-1864, and her future husband, John Erastus Lane, 1837-1893, both of whom were soldiers with the Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War.
 

43. Blackwood mss., 1852-1887 0.1 Linear Feet (1 folio)

The Blackwood mss., 1852-1887, consists of letters to Sir Stevenson Arthur Blackwood, 1832-1893, postal official and reformer, and to his mother, Cecilia Georgiana Byng Blackwood, 1802-1881.
 

44. Cagle mss., 1964-1973 0.4 linear feet (1 box)

The Cagle mss., 1964-1973, consists of the correspondence of Geoffrey Edward West Household, 1900-1988, novelist; Anaïs Nin, 1903-1977, author; Eric Honeywood Partridge, 1894-1979, author; and Ian Hamilton Finlay, 1925-2006, poet, with William Rea Cagle, 1933- , librarian at Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana.
 
This project is a compilation of interviews of subjects with strong ties to and memories of Indiana University, primarily at the Bloomington campus. The interviewees include former students, faculty, and staff, among others. The information contained in the interviews generally spans a little more than the first half of the twentieth century and often deals with the administrations under presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells. The project is a survey of Indiana University's history as a whole including information about various academic departments, athletics, student organizations, campus growth, university development, living conditions, segregation and the treatment of African-Americans, the administration, and the importance of jazz at Indiana University. In addition, the impact of specific events, such as the Great Depression, World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War, and water shortages, is detailed in many of the interviews in this project.
 
Eddie Gilreath was one of the first African American music industry professionals to hold executive level marketing and sales positions with major record labels including Motown, Warner Bros., Elektra Entertainment, Geffen, and MCA/Universal Distribution, promoting major artists across multiple genres. Included are personal papers and correspondence, marketing reports, press clippings, photographs, certified gold and platinum album plaques, clothing, and time-based media in both published and unpublished audio and video formats.
 

47. The Vagabond, 1923-1931 1 cubic foot (3 boxes)

Published from 1923 until 1931, primarily as a bi-monthly publication with some interruption, The vagabond featured the poetry, visual art, essays, criticism, short stories and humor which targeted not only Indiana University's undergraduates, but also its alumni and prominent members of the faculty.
 

49. Antonow mss., 1956-1963 0.2 linear feet (1 box)

The Antonow mss., 1956-1963, consists of poems by James Vincent Cunningham, Stanley Kunitz, Robert Lowell, Marianne Moore, Carl Sandburg, Sir Walter Scott, Karl Shapiro, and Richard Wilbur, all collected by lawyer Joseph P. Antonow, 1915-1990.