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1. The Date, 1946-1947 .4 cubic feet (2 small dc)

The Date was an Indiana University student-published editorial circulated in late 1940s that documented campus culture in a light and humorous way. This small collection consists of issues spanning 1946-1947.
 
Eddie Gilreath was one of the first African American music industry professionals to hold executive level marketing and sales positions with major record labels including Motown, Warner Bros., Elektra Entertainment, Geffen, and MCA/Universal Distribution, promoting major artists across multiple genres. Included are personal papers and correspondence, marketing reports, press clippings, photographs, certified gold and platinum album plaques, clothing, and time-based media in both published and unpublished audio and video formats.
 
This project is a compilation of interviews of subjects with strong ties to and memories of Indiana University, primarily at the Bloomington campus. The interviewees include former students, faculty, and staff, among others. The information contained in the interviews generally spans a little more than the first half of the twentieth century and often deals with the administrations under presidents William Lowe Bryan and Herman B Wells. The project is a survey of Indiana University's history as a whole including information about various academic departments, athletics, student organizations, campus growth, university development, living conditions, segregation and the treatment of African-Americans, the administration, and the importance of jazz at Indiana University. In addition, the impact of specific events, such as the Great Depression, World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War, and water shortages, is detailed in many of the interviews in this project.
 

4. The Vagabond, 1923-1931 1 cubic foot (3 boxes)

Published from 1923 until 1931, primarily as a bi-monthly publication with some interruption, The vagabond featured the poetry, visual art, essays, criticism, short stories and humor which targeted not only Indiana University's undergraduates, but also its alumni and prominent members of the faculty.
 
Transcripts for oral history interviews related to philanthropy, which were conducted by the Indiana University Center for Documentary Research and Practice, formerly known as Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory, formerly known as the Indiana Oral History Research Center. The American Foundations Oral History Project consists of a series of interviews with prominent American philanthropists, each of whom relates their background, the development of their values, and their philosophies of philanthropy. The purpose and state of American philanthropy, including those family foundations and corporate foundations, form a central topic, as do the recent trend of increasing diversity and opinions on grant evaluation and philanthropic assessment. In addition, many interviewees comment on the role of government in philanthropy and the system of ethics at play in American philanthropy. The Center on Philanthropy Oral History Project traces creation of the Center from its earliest stages and its evolution into a fully operating academic institution dedicated to the study of philanthropy. It includes the negotiations in bringing the Fund Raising School to Indianapolis, Indiana, the grant proposals to the Lilly Endowment, finding the Center's first director, and the creation of its mission statement. This project also contains many different people's views on the study of philanthropy and the importance and success of the Center. The "Philanthropy: a history of fund raising" Project discusses the history of philanthropy and fundraising as a profession. The interviewees, all workers of different generations, discuss the various issues and changes the field of fundraising has faced over the years, with a major focus on fundraising in America. The changing public image of philanthropy, the introduction of women into the field, and the skills and techniques needed within the profession are all discussed in depth throughout the interviews. The major differences between various types of fundraising are also discussed.
 
The Indiana University Audio-Visual Center (IU-AVC) was a service of the Indiana University Extension Division that produced, collected and distributed educational films and videos to institutions and organizations throughout the United States. The films, videos and all paper documentation that made up this century old film distribution unit of Indiana University was transferred to the IU Libraries in the early 2000's. As part of what is now the core holdings of the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive, in addition to the films and videos that made up the early years of the Archive, the paper teacher's guides that correspond to instructional films and videos spanning the late 1920's into the early 2000's are an important historical record of this history.
 
This collection is comprised of books that were part of the Kokomo Extension Division Library collection prior to the establishment of the current Indiana University Kokomo campus on Washington Street in 1965. Indiana University established its first extension division in Kokomo, Indiana, in 1945. First located in a house on West Taylor Street, the division moved to West Sycamore Street in 1946 and expanded to include the Seiberling Mansion, Carriage House, and Elliott House.
 
The I Association (formerly I-Men Association (1913-2006) and I-Women Association (1982-2006)) honors exceptional athletes at Indiana University Bloomington. This collection contains files about I Association alumni events and event planning, Board of Directors meeting information, I Association membership, and email, letter, and memo correspondence between I Association staff and alumni.
 

15. Edmund Battersby papers, 1968-2013 2.6 cubic feet (3 boxes, 5 oversize folders)

Edmund Battersby was an internationally renowned concert virtuoso pianist and professor at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University. This collection contains materials from his professional career as a touring musician including: posters, programs, sheet music, and correspondence, the bulk of which stems from the 1970s to the 1990s.
 

16. Willkie Residence Center scrapbooks and other materials, 1962-2007, bulk 1968-1981 1 cubic foot (4 scrapbooks, 3 legal folders and 1 oversize folder)

The Wendell L. Willkie Quadrangle opened in the fall of 1964 as a residence hall for men and women, and was rededicated as the Willkie Residence Center in 2000. This collection contains four scrapbooks that were compiled by staff of the Willkie Quadrangle residence hall between 1968 and 1981. The scrapbooks contain photographs, newspaper clippings, event pamphlets, and other materials that document staff and resident events during their respective time periods. In addition, the collection contains loose photographs of Willkie staff and leadership teams from 2004-2007, as well as loose newspaper clippings and other materials documenting Willkie residents and staff from the late 1960s to the early 1980s.
 

17. The Black Student Voice, July 1968 .1 cubic foot (2 folders)

The Black Student Voice was a newsletter published by the "Office of Afro-American Affairs" at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. This group was established by Black student activists in the spring of 1968 as a means of advocating for the creation of a formal university office to oversee the academic, social, and financial wellbeing of Black students, faculty, and staff, as well as an academic program in Black Studies. The collection contains four issues of The Black Student Voice newsletter, which the Office published weekly throughout the month of July 1968.
 

20. Indiana University Medical Center Records, 1898-1997 32.2 cubic feet (29 cubic feet of ledgers and other bound volumes, 3 Cartons and 1 Document box)

The Indiana University Medical Center is the collective administrative identity of the hospitals, clinics, laboratories, and other facilities that provide medical services in conjunction with the Indiana University School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Dentistry, and School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. Long, Coleman, Riley, University, and Wishard hospitals fall under the administrative aegis of the IUMC. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, financial data, patient records, and other records.
 

21. IUPUI Office for Women Records, 1983-2000 4 cubic feet (4 cartons)

IUPUI administrators created the IUPUI Task Force on the Status of Women Faculty in 1994 to investigate how women were appointed and promoted on the campus and to assess the campus climate for women's success. The task force recommended in 1996 the creation of a campus office to facilitate improvements on the IUPUI campus for women. Administrators created the IUPUI Office for Women (OFW) in October, 1996, with the goal to improve the campus environment for women faculty, staff, and students. The director of OFW also serves as chair of the newly created IUPUI Commission on Women to develop opportunities and improve equity and the campus envirnment for women. Records include minutes, correspondence, reports, and publications.
 
At the time of the formation of IUPUI, there was no departmental organization for the religion courses and faculty; courses were taught by associate faculty from nearby private colleges or IU Bloomington and supervised by the Philosophy Department. Soon, however, the Department of Religious Studies was created under the School of Liberal Arts. Records include primarily materials from conferences sponsored by the department and materials from faculty member Jan Shipps.
 

24. Purdue University Records, 1943-1997 16 cubic feet (16 cartons)

Purdue University was founded as a state Land Grant university in 1869 at West Lafayette, Indiana. It has created several regional, or extension, campuses, including a campus in Indianapolis (see UA-060, Purdue University-Indianapolis Extension) that became IUPUI. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, bulletins, publications, and other records.
 

26. Department of Economics Records, 1969-1991 2 cubic feet (2 cartons)

The Department of Economics is a unit of the School of Liberal Arts. The department was formed from the merger of faculties from the Indiana University-Indianapolis Downtown Campus and the Purdue University-Indianapolis Extension on the creation of IUPUI. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, publications, and other materials.
 

27. IU Board of Trustees Records, 1966-2012 11 cubic feet (9 cartons and 6 document boxes)

The Indiana University Board of Trustees is the governing body of Indiana University. By agreement in the merger of the Indianapolis campuses of Indiana University and Purdue University in 1969, the resulting IUPUI would be governed by the IU Board of Trustees. Records include minutes, agendas, and other records.
 

29. Cleland mss., 1911-1946 0.6 linear feet (2 boxes)

The Cleland mss., 1911-1946, consists of the papers of botanist Ralph Erskine Cleland, 1892-1971. They consist chiefly of correspondence with prominent scientists on Oenothera, evening primrose.
 

30. Colfax mss., 1853-1884 .2 linear feet (2 folders (38 items).)

The Colfax mss., 1853-1884, consists of the papers of South Bend, Indiana, newspaperman, speaker of the House of Representatives, and vice-president of the United States Schuyler Colfax, 1823-1885.
 

32. Clemens mss. II, 1945 .1 linear feet (1 folder)

The Clemens mss. II, 1945, consists of letters sent to author Cyril Clemens, 1902-1999, of Kirkwood, Missouri, concerning a symposium planned in honor of Ernie Pyle (Ernest Taylor Pyle, 1900-1945, journalist) following his death on April 18.
 

33. Office of the Dean of the Faculties/Executive Vice Chancellor Records, 1966-2007 309.1 cubic feet (308 cartons, 2 document boxes, and 1 flat box)

This collection contains the records of the Office of the Dean of the Faculties and of the Executive Vice Chancellor. The dean of the faculties is the chief academic officer at IUPUI and oversees the development and administration of academic programs, faculty appointments, professional development, promotion and tenure, and academic support operations. The executive vice chancellor is the second highest ranking administrator in the IUPUI administration. The title was created in 1973, and generally the person holding that position has also been the dean of the faculties. The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, university publications, and files documenting the dean of the faculties/executive vice chancellor's role in the development of IUPUI's academic programs and the administrator's involvement with community, regional, and national organizations.
 

35. Jan Shipps Papers, 1970-2005 3.25 cubic feet (3 cartons and 1 document box)

This collection contains the papers of Professor Jan Shipps, a faculty member at IUPUI from 1973-1995. She taught in the Departments of History and Religious Studies and in the American Studies Program. She served as the director of the Center for American Studies and as a research associate for the POLIS Center. She is a nationally recognized expert on Mormonism and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This collection contains correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports, and research materials relating to Shipps's work as a faculty member and administrator and to her research interests.
 

40. Office of University Architect Records, 1945-1983 23 cubic feet (23 cartons)

The Office of University Architect is a separate unit, based at Indiana University Bloomington, with an office on the IUPUI campus. The office plans and coordinates building and infrastructure projects, and works closely with Campus Facilities Services and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. Architectural drawings for IUPUI campus buildings and facilities are housed separately. Records include building and construction specifications, manuals, and other materials.
 

42. Department of Physical Therapy Records, 1926-1990 7.1 cubic feet (4 cartons, 7 pamphlet boxes, 1 flat box)

Physical therapy has long had a presence in the treatment offered in the Indiana University hospitals. In 1956 a bachelor of science program in physical therapy was established under the division of Allied Health in the School of Medicine. Graduate programs in physical therapy were later established. The Department of Physical Therapy is currently under the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. Records include correspondence, reports, patient files, publications, and other materials.
 

44. IU-Indianapolis Downtown Campus Records, 1915-1985 8.7 cubic feet (7 cartons, 1 document box, 3 flat boxes)

Indiana University started offering regular classes in Indianapolis in 1891. An Extension Division was created in 1912 and began to offer a small number of courses for credit. A gradual increase of class offerings and enrollments in Indianapolis occurred in the following decades. The university occupied a variety of buildings in downtown Indianapolis over the years in what over time became known as the Downtown Campus (DTC). Courses in liberal arts, social sciences, mathematics, and the natural sciences were offered by the Downtown Campus, whereas Indiana University's professional schools located in Indianapolis (i.e., the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, and Law, etc.) offered separate programs loosely connected to the other. The creation of IUPUI in 1969 more closely fused the various separate entities of Indiana University in Indianapolis together. Records include correspondence, minutes, reports, publications, and other materials.
 
Dorith Minna Ofri-Scheps (1930-2015), known as "Jɛbɛ" to the Vai people, was a linguist and scholar of the Vai language and culture. Her dissertation, "On the Object of ethnology: a propos of the Vai culture of Liberia 1963-88" was submitted and defended in 1991, at the University of Bern, after the outbreak of the First Liberian Civil War had interrupted her field research.Her correspondence covers many aspects of Vai language and culture, touching on the cumulative work of August Klingenheben, Bai Tamia Moore, Gail Stewart, Jangaba Johnson, C. K. Kandakai, and many others. Her research drew on interviews with Mɔmɔlu Cole, and her assistants included Morris Davies, who died in the war, Fatu Kiazolu, and in later life Poppy Willard.
 

47. Committee of Returned Voluntee mss. V, 1967-1970 .1 linear feet (1 folder; 71 items.)

The Committee of Returned Volunteers mss., 1967-1970, consists of the papers of the Committee of Returned Volunteers, Bloomington Chapter. The CRV is an organization of persons who have worked in voluntary service programs in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and in the United States.
 

50. Dubin mss., 1923-1953 5 boxes

The Dubin mss., 1923-1953, consists of manuscript, mimeographed, and printed materials collected by Martin Dubin in connection with the preparation of his Ph.D. dissertation in the Department of Government, Indiana University.