Tuba-Euphonium Oral History February 11, 2000-November 6, 2001ohrc108

A Guide to the Collection of Oral History Interviews at Indiana University Bloomington


Finding aid created by: Finding aid prepared by the staff of the Center for the Study of History and Memory with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Division of Preservation and Access, 2000-2002


Creator Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory
Title: Tuba-Euphonium Oral History
Dates: 2000-2001
Quantity: 12 interviewsAudio files, transcripts, and collateral materials
Abstract: In the Tuba-Euphonium Oral History Project, seven tuba musicians were interviewed about their early training and subsequent careers in the music industry. Each man--Robert Rusk, Jerry Lackey, L.B. Oliver, Ivan F. Hammond, Kenneth Schubert, Samuel Gnagey, and Paul Krzywicki discussed instrument design and different methods of teaching about and playing the tuba. All five of these men studied at Indiana University and went on to play in other venues. They talk about their experiences with William J. "Bill" Bell at Indiana University as well as Bell's methods of teaching at the school.
Location: Interviews are housed in Franklin Hall, Room 0030B. Copies of interview transcripts are also held by the IU Libraries University Archives. Contact archives@indiana.edu for more information. For other locations housing the interviews from this project, please contact the Center for Documentary Research and Practice office.
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains twelve interviews conducted from 2000 to 2003. The interviews range thirteen to forty-seven pages of typed transcripts, but have no tapes.


Restrictions

Usage Restrictions: The archive of the Center for Documentary Research and Practice at Indiana University is open to the use of researchers. Copies of transcript pages are available only when such copies are permitted by the deed of gift. Scholars must honor any restrictions the interviewee placed on the use of the interview. Since some of our earlier (pre-computer) transcripts do not exist in final form, any editing marks in a transcript (deletions, additions, corrections) are to be quoted as marked. Audio files may not be copied for patrons unless the deed of gift permits it, and a transcript is unavailable for that interview. The same rules of use that apply to a transcript apply to the audio interview. Interviews may not be reproduced in full for any public use, but excerpted quotes may be used as long as researchers fully cite the data in their research, including accession number, interview date, interviewee's and interviewer's name, and page(s).


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

[interviewee first name last name] interview, by [interviewer first name last name], [interview date(s)], [call number], [project name], Center for Documentary Research and Practice, Indiana University, Bloomington, [page number(s) or tape number and side if no transcript; if digital audio and no transcript, cite time when quote occurs].

Acquisition Information

Oral history interviews conducted by the Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory from 1968 to the present, with particular focus on the history of twentieth-century America and the Midwest.


Table of Contents


00-103 Baker, Buddy September 25, 2002
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 38 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
Buddy Baker discusses his education and musical experiences with the trombone. He discusses those who influenced him, those he learned from, and those he performed with. He discusses the changes in musical education and the fundamentals of learning an instrument. Baker talks about his hobbies and compares the learning and practicing techniques to those of music.
Access Status
Open
01-098 Gnagey, Samuel July 1, 2001
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 13pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
Samuel Gnagey discusses his early musical experiences, education at Indiana University, and lifelong association with music. He cites his father, a talented tuba player, as one of his biggest influences; a music education major at Indiana University, Gnagey also took pre-medical courses for several years. His jobs over the years reflect both areas of interest; he was a nurse, an emergency medical technician, a music teacher, a tubist, and a musical instrument creator and repairman. In this interview, he also discusses studying with William J. Bell and his association with his Indiana University classmates Donald Harry, Ivan F. Hammond, Paul Kryswicki, and others.
Access Status
Open
00-094 Hammond, Ivan F. April 26, 2000
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 28 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
In this interview, Ivan F. Hammond talks about his career as a tuba musician. He talks extensively about instrument design and playing styles. In addition, Hammond mentions his training at Indiana University and his teachers and mentors who helped him succeed. He said that he started playing the tuba late in life, at the age of sixteen, and so had to practice daily for hours to feel like he had achieved competency.
Access Status
Open
00-095 Krzywicki, Paul February 11, 2000
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 24 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
In this interview, Paul Krzywicki talks about his career as a tuba musician. He begins by talking about his early training and his years at Indiana University. He also played with the United States Military Band at West Point. Krzywicki has played with the Philadelphia Orchestra for twenty-eight years and had to interview with Eugene Ormandy for the position.
Access Status
Open
00-097 Lackey, Jerry August 25, 2000
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 22 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
In this interview, Jerry Lackey talks about his experiences at Indiana University before the arrival of William J. "Bill" Bell. Lackey comes from a musical family and currently teaches sight-signing, jazz band, and orchestra at Clay Middle and High Schools. He also describes in detail his lessons with Bill Bell, playing in the operas at Indiana University, and associating with various other colleagues while in the Indiana University School of Music.
Access Status
Open
00-104 Marzan, Frederick J. November 17, 2001
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 43 pages, no tapes, index
Scope and Content Note
Frederick J. Marzan discusses becoming passionate about music in high school and his struggle to become a good musician. He recalls musicians from whom he learned through lessons and observation, particularly William Bell. He discusses his musical experiences. Marzan talks about various tuba models and about designing his own.
Access Status
Open
00-100 Oliver, L.B. November 5, 2001
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 15 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
L.B. Oliver discusses his training on the tuba, mentioning with gratitude and fond memories such mentors as Robert Barr and William J. "Bill" Bell. He describes the time he spent playing in the band of the traveling Mills Brothers Circus, the lifestyle it entailed, and various stories he recalls about his time in the circus. In addition, he comments on the quality of various tuba models he has played throughout his career as a musician and teacher.
Access Status
Open
00-105 Parr, James T. March 11, 2003
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 20 pages, no tapes, index
Scope and Content Note
James T. Parr discusses his years spent at Indiana University where he focused on a degree in mathematics, but also participated in many musical opprotunities as a tuba player, including the "Marching Hundred", orchestra, brass choir and others. He was known to a generation of tubists in the early 1960's as 'the person who imported Alexander tubas." He also dicusses his life a a professor at Illinois State University, his fellow muscicians, and his musical endeavors there.
Access Status
Open
00-101 Robinson, Jack October 3, 2002
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 39 pages, no tapes, index
Scope and Content Note
Jack Robinson discusses his musical experiences and education with the trombone. He talks about Professor William Bell, his teaching approach, personality, and musical career. Robinson discusses those with whom he has studied and worked. He shares anecdotes about his time at Indiana University and about his musical career.
Access Status
Open
00-096 Rusk, Robert May 24, 2000
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 28 pp.; no tapes; index
Scope and Content Note
In this interview, Robert Rusk talks about his early training and subsequent career as a tuba musician. He talks briefly about his time as a student at Indiana University and the competitiveness of the programs in the School of Music. In addition, Rusk talks about his interest in pre-World War II American-made tubas and the unique American tuba sound. He also talks about tuba design and his experiences playing other instruments.
Access Status
Open
00-099 Schubert, Kenneth November 6, 2001
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 47 pp.; no tapes; index; curriculum vitae of interviewee
Scope and Content Note
Kenneth Schubert discusses his family background, how he began playing the trumpet, how he began teaching, and his music professors and fellow musicians. He speaks of his education, shares stories about his professors and training at the Indiana University School of Music, and talks about different models of trumpet and cornet. In addition, Mr. Schubert describes his relationships and memories of William J. "Bill" Bell, William Adam, Thomas Beversdorf, and other musicians and professors.
Access Status
Open
00-102 Streeter, Thomas W. October 2, 2002
CreatorNowicke, Carole E. 20 pages, no tapes, index
Scope and Content Note
Thomas W. Streeter discusses his musical experiences with the trombone. He talks about the bands he worked for during college. He recalls professors he studied under. Streeter discusses his time in the Airmen of Note-- the United States Air Force band-- before becoming a professor at Illinois Wesleyan University where he set up a jazz program.
Access Status
Open